Coronavirus risk factors prompt public health concerns, though it’s not as deadly as SARS

Emergency physician-led teams are on the frontlines of coronavirus treatment, prevention and response. JACEP Open, a new official open access journal of the American College of Emergency Physicians, explores COVID-19 coronavirus concerns in two analyses. The first paper explores risk factors for transmission, while the second outlines broad public-health concerns amplified during an outbreak.

The impact of the coronavirus is significant, not just in terms of individuals’ health, but also in a business sense. Many hospitals and health systems have reported concerns about a dwindling supply of face masks and other personal protective equipment. Efforts to contain the disease may

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Coronavirus forces cancellation of HIMSS20

For the first time in 58 years, the HIMSS Global Health Conference & Exhibition – which was scheduled to take place March 9-13 in Orlando, Florida – has been canceled.

HIMSS has been keeping a close eye on the fast-changing worldwide coronavirus situation for weeks, and said the decision to cancel comes in light of recent reports from the World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

It was decided that the potential to spread the virus – especially given HIMSS’ audience of healthcare professionals – was too great.

“We recognize all the hard work that so many

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Insurers will cover testing of coronavirus, AHIP says

Insurers are voluntarily covering the diagnostic testing of the coronavirus, according to the Board of Directors for America’s Health Insurance Plans.

Health insurers will cover needed testing when ordered by a physician. They are taking action to ease network referral and prior authorization requirements, and/or waiving patient cost-sharing, AHIP said.

AHIP said it is also working with public and private-sector partners so that out-of-pocket costs are not a barrier to people seeking testing and treatment for COVID-19.

The trade association is also working with state and federal policymakers to provide more guidance and flexibility for preventive services, benefit design and

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Despite red tape, most pediatricians are supportive of national vaccination program

Despite bureaucratic hurdles, the vast majority of pediatricians want to keep participating in a national program that provides vaccinations at no cost to children who are on Medicaid, uninsured, or who are American Indian/Alaska Native, according to researchers at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus.

The Vaccine For Children Program was created in 1993 to keep children from contracting vaccine-preventable diseases due to an inability to pay for the drugs. Since then, it has increased vaccination rates, decreased vaccine-preventable illnesses and reduced social and racial disparities among those inoculated.

The study, published online in the journal Pediatrics, examined pediatrician

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